Friday, 28 June 2013

Top 12 Right-to-Know Grocers

Top 12 Right-to-Know Grocers

http://oca-orca.org/top-12-grocers-2013/

It was a challenge to single out only 12 overall winners, when all 50 regional winners have such impressive policies and practices for educating customers about GMOs and providing non-GMO alternatives. The “Diligent Dozen” winning stores are those grocers who are leading the natural food industry by working with manufacturers and local producers to transition to non-GMO ingredients and by advocating for GMO labeling.
  • Berkshire Organics Market & Deli, Dalton, MAStore LogoBerkshire Organics stocks roughly 3,000 mainly local and organic grocery items. The store requires signed affidavits verifying that manufactured product, ingredients, and feed used by livestock farmers are GMO-free. Store staff visit sustainable farms to verify acceptable farming practices.
  • Dad’s Organic Market, Saskatoon, SKStore LogoDad’s Organic Market created a No GMO policy one year ago, and communicates that policy to manufacturers and vendors. Dad’s requires GMO-free statements on manufacturers’ letterhead before the store will purchase products containing suspect ingredients. Buyers always push manufacturers to remove GMO ingredients from their products.
  • Good Earth Natural Foods, Fairfax, CAStore LogoGood Earth Natural Foods is a Non-GMO Project supporting retailer. The store donated $25,000 to Prop 37, the largest donation of any grocer in the country.
  • Jimbo’s…Naturally! San Diego, CAStore LogoJimbo’s Naturally is one of the country’s pioneer GMO-Free grocer activists and organic advocates. The company has persuaded a number of manufacturers to remove suspect products from their foods, resulting in those companies either going organic or pursuing Non-GMO Project verification. Jimbo’s Naturally donated $10,000 to support Prop 37.
  • MOM’s Organic Market, Baltimore, MD & Washington, DCStore LogoIn July 2012, MOM’s began informing suppliers that they would no longer accept foods with high-risk GMO ingredients, and that products with ingredients that may contain GMOs had to be either certified organic or Non-GMO Project verified. MOM’s contributed $10,000 to Prop 37, and $5,000 to Yes on 522.
  • Native Sun Natural Foods Market, Jacksonville, FLStore LogoNative Sun has five staff members dedicated to product research, who meet regularly to review new products and analyze the ingredients for possible GMOs. Researchers discuss inert ingredients and their sources, and keep an updated handbook listing ingredients that are allowed and those that are banned.
  • Natural Grocery Company, El Cerrito & Berkeley, CAStore LogoThe store established a policy about four years ago requiring buyers to inform manufacturers and vendors that they will purchase only organic products, except in cases where organic alternatives are not available. However, all non-organic products must be GMO-free and verified by the Non-GMO Project. The company donated over $3,200 to support Prop 37.
  • Nature’s Food Patch Market & Cafe, Clearwater, FLStore LogoAll products suspected of containing GMO ingredients are labeled with GMO tags. In addition to product tags, Nature’s Food Patch educates consumers and alerts them to GMOs via email updates, Facebook and the store’s website. The store also provides non-GMO pamphlets and packets of GMO information for customers who ask about GMOs.
  • Ocean Beach People’s Organic Food Co-Op, San Diego, CAStore LogoManufacturers are informed that all products purchased by the co-op need to be either organic or have an affidavit certifying that products are GMO-free. Products containing GMO ingredients are removed from the store. Products are either labeled organic, Non-GMO Project verified or have an affidavit certifying the product is GMO-free. Ocean Beach Peoples Organic Food Market donated $5,000 to support Prop 37, the California initiative to label GMOs.
  • Sundance Natural Foods, Eugene, ORStore LogoSundance practices and promotes the ethos of ‘Gatekeeping,’ believing that we hold a moral and practical duty to educate our community about all issues surrounding the responsible production and sustenance of local, national and global food markets and agriculture, and to protect our food supply from those who would compromise and destroy it for profit.
  • Terra Organica, Bellingham, WAStore LogoTerra Organica is still refining its GMO tagging system. The store surveyed its customers about how to handle products that may contain GMOs, asking them which they preferred: No labels, label GMOs, or get rid of all GMO items. Customers overwhelmingly chose labels, which began appearing on Terra Organica’s shelves in March.
  • The Sunspot Natural Market, Kokomo, INStore LogoThe store contacts manufacturers who claim that their products are GMO-free, but do not have non GMO Project verification. Strong relationships have been built with brokers, reps and manufacturers to make sure that GMO products do not enter their store. Thousands of homemade shelf talkers pointing out non-GMO verified products are on display throughout the store.
It was a challenge to single out only 12 overall winners, when all 50 regional winners have such impressive policies and practices for educating customers about GMOs and providing non-GMO alternatives. The “Diligent Dozen” winning stores are those grocers who are leading the natural food industry by working with manufacturers and local producers to transition to non-GMO ingredients and by advocating for GMO labeling.
  • Berkshire Organics Market & Deli, Dalton, MAStore LogoBerkshire Organics stocks roughly 3,000 mainly local and organic grocery items. The store requires signed affidavits verifying that manufactured product, ingredients, and feed used by livestock farmers are GMO-free. Store staff visit sustainable farms to verify acceptable farming practices.
  • Dad’s Organic Market, Saskatoon, SKStore LogoDad’s Organic Market created a No GMO policy one year ago, and communicates that policy to manufacturers and vendors. Dad’s requires GMO-free statements on manufacturers’ letterhead before the store will purchase products containing suspect ingredients. Buyers always push manufacturers to remove GMO ingredients from their products.
  • Good Earth Natural Foods, Fairfax, CAStore LogoGood Earth Natural Foods is a Non-GMO Project supporting retailer. The store donated $25,000 to Prop 37, the largest donation of any grocer in the country.
  • Jimbo’s…Naturally! San Diego, CAStore LogoJimbo’s Naturally is one of the country’s pioneer GMO-Free grocer activists and organic advocates. The company has persuaded a number of manufacturers to remove suspect products from their foods, resulting in those companies either going organic or pursuing Non-GMO Project verification. Jimbo’s Naturally donated $10,000 to support Prop 37.
  • MOM’s Organic Market, Baltimore, MD & Washington, DCStore LogoIn July 2012, MOM’s began informing suppliers that they would no longer accept foods with high-risk GMO ingredients, and that products with ingredients that may contain GMOs had to be either certified organic or Non-GMO Project verified. MOM’s contributed $10,000 to Prop 37, and $5,000 to Yes on 522.
  • Native Sun Natural Foods Market, Jacksonville, FLStore LogoNative Sun has five staff members dedicated to product research, who meet regularly to review new products and analyze the ingredients for possible GMOs. Researchers discuss inert ingredients and their sources, and keep an updated handbook listing ingredients that are allowed and those that are banned.
  • Natural Grocery Company, El Cerrito & Berkeley, CAStore LogoThe store established a policy about four years ago requiring buyers to inform manufacturers and vendors that they will purchase only organic products, except in cases where organic alternatives are not available. However, all non-organic products must be GMO-free and verified by the Non-GMO Project. The company donated over $3,200 to support Prop 37.
  • Nature’s Food Patch Market & Cafe, Clearwater, FLStore LogoAll products suspected of containing GMO ingredients are labeled with GMO tags. In addition to product tags, Nature’s Food Patch educates consumers and alerts them to GMOs via email updates, Facebook and the store’s website. The store also provides non-GMO pamphlets and packets of GMO information for customers who ask about GMOs.
  • Ocean Beach People’s Organic Food Co-Op, San Diego, CAStore LogoManufacturers are informed that all products purchased by the co-op need to be either organic or have an affidavit certifying that products are GMO-free. Products containing GMO ingredients are removed from the store. Products are either labeled organic, Non-GMO Project verified or have an affidavit certifying the product is GMO-free. Ocean Beach Peoples Organic Food Market donated $5,000 to support Prop 37, the California initiative to label GMOs.
  • Sundance Natural Foods, Eugene, ORStore LogoSundance practices and promotes the ethos of ‘Gatekeeping,’ believing that we hold a moral and practical duty to educate our community about all issues surrounding the responsible production and sustenance of local, national and global food markets and agriculture, and to protect our food supply from those who would compromise and destroy it for profit.
  • Terra Organica, Bellingham, WAStore LogoTerra Organica is still refining its GMO tagging system. The store surveyed its customers about how to handle products that may contain GMOs, asking them which they preferred: No labels, label GMOs, or get rid of all GMO items. Customers overwhelmingly chose labels, which began appearing on Terra Organica’s shelves in March.
  • The Sunspot Natural Market, Kokomo, INStore LogoThe store contacts manufacturers who claim that their products are GMO-free, but do not have non GMO Project verification. Strong relationships have been built with brokers, reps and manufacturers to make sure that GMO products do not enter their store. Thousands of homemade shelf talkers pointing out non-GMO verified products are on display throughout the store.

Thursday, 27 June 2013

Help Leadnow launch the #facetoface hashtag with some thunder, and motivate others in our online communities to publicly turn up the pressure on Joe Oliver.



Over the last week, almost 500 more people have joined the Leadnow Amplify Network for a special social media mission to support the Fourth Annual Tar Sands Healing Walk -- Welcome!

Background - It’s becoming common knowledge in Canada that our government spends a lot of time meeting with oil industry lobbyists and learning to understand the world through their eyes. But when it comes to the daily lives of communities directly impacted by the tar sands, our government prefers to look the other way.

Community leaders are standing up and reaching out. The Keepers of the Athabasca have invited Natural Resource Minister Joe Oliver to join them at the Fourth Annual Tar Sands Healing Walk and meet face-to-face with the communities that are being poisoned by the reckless expansion of the tar sands.[1]

These communities should have a say in the decisions that profoundly affect their lives, and almost 8,000 people have already sent email invitations to Minister Oliver.

Healing Walk Action - Now let’s use our social media accounts to tell Minister Joe Oliver to meet face-to-face with the communities impacted by out of control tar sands expansion, and walk shoulder to shoulder with them in this year’s Healing Walk.

To do this we’ve created a new hashtag to rally thousands of people on Twitter and on Facebook - the hashtag is #facetoface. If Minister Oliver can make time for oil industry lobbyists then he can make time to walk with the communities being poisoned by the tar sands. That seems fair, doesn’t it?

Help us launch the #facetoface hashtag with some thunder, and motivate others in our online communities to publicly turn up the pressure on Joe Oliver.

Simply click on the Facebook and Twitter action links below to start raising the pressure on Joe Oliver:


1. Share on Facebook




Click here to share the graphic on Facebook - Add your own note if you like, and use the #facetoface hashtage.g.: "Joe Oliver should meet #facetoface with communities being poisoned by the #tarsands"


2. Share on Twitter

Click here to share the graphic on Twitter - then just click "ReTweet"


3. Tweet at Joe Oliver

Click to Tweet: "Tell @JoeOliver1 to meet #facetoface w/ communities poisoned by #tarsands"


Thank you for all that you do,

With hope and respect, Adam and Matthew on behalf of the Leadnow.ca team


Sources:

[1] Don’t let our government look the other way (Leadnow.ca)
http://www.leadnow.ca/healing-walk

Tuesday, 25 June 2013

3 Citations of Ethnoveterinary medicines used for ruminants in British Columbia, Canada

New citations







Ethnoveterinary medicines used for ruminants in British Columbia, Canada.








Cited in:

Ethnobotanical knowledge on indigenous fruits in Ohangwena and Oshikoto regions in Norther...

Authors: Ahmad Cheikhyoussef,Werner Embashu

Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine 05/2013 9(1):34.

Ethnobotanical knowledge on indigenous fruits in Ohangwena and ...

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23697554
by A Cheikhyoussef - 2013
May 22, 2013 – Ethnobotanical knowledge on indigenous fruits in Ohangwena and Oshikoto regions in Northern Namibia. Cheikhyoussef A, Embashu W.


View








Ethnoveterinary medicines used for ruminants in British Columbia, Canada.








Cited in:

A survey of plants and plant products traditionally used in livestock health management in...

Authors: Martin M Gakuubi,Wycliffe Wanzala

Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine 10/2012 8(1):39.

View

A survey of plants and plant products traditionally used in livestock ...

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23044218
by MM Gakuubi - 2012 - Cited by 2 - Related articles
Oct 8, 2012 – A survey of plants and plant products traditionally used in livestock health management in Buuri district, Meru County, Kenya. Gakuubi MM ...






Ethnoveterinary medicines used for ruminants in British Columbia, Canada.








Cited in:

Plant ethnoveterinary practices in two pyrenean territories of catalonia (iberian peninsul...

Authors: Esperança Carrió,Montse Rigat,Teresa Garnatje

Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine 01/2012 2012:896295.

View

Plant Ethnoveterinary Practices in Two Pyrenean Territories of ...

pubmedcentralcanada.ca/pmcc/articles/PMC3399547/
Jul 8, 2012 – Plant Ethnoveterinary Practices in Two Pyrenean Territories of Catalonia (Iberian Peninsula) and in Two Areas of the Balearic Islands and ...

Sunday, 23 June 2013

Martin Bernal, ‘Black Athena’ Scholar, Dies at 76

Martin Bernal, whose three-volume work “Black Athena” ignited an academic debate by arguing that the African and Semitic lineage of Western civilization had been scrubbed from the record of ancient Greece by 18th- and 19th-century historians steeped in the racism of their times, died on June 9 in Cambridge, England. He was 76.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/23/arts/martin-bernal-black-athena-scholar-dies-at-76.html?smid=pl-share

Friday, 21 June 2013

Anti-Cancer Effect of Angelica sinensis on Women's Reproductive Cancer


Anti-Cancer Effect of Angelica sinensis on Women's Reproductive Cancer

By: Hong-Hong Zhu, Gui-Hui Huang, Patricia L. Tate, and Lyndon L. Larcom

Background:  Danggui, the root of Angelica Sinensis, has traditionally been used for the treatment of women’s reproductive disorders in China for thousands of years. This study was to determine whether Danggui have potential anti-cancer effect on women’s cancer and its potential mechanism.

Methods: Danggui was extracted by ethanol. The Cell Titer 96® Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay was used to compare the effects of Danggui on human breast (MCF-7 and 7368) and cervical (CaSki and SiHa) cancer cells with its effects on normal fibroblasts (HTB-125). A revised Ames test was used to test for antimutagenicity. The standard strains of Salmonella typhimarium (TA) 100 and 102 were used in the test. Methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) and UV light were used as positive mutagen controls and ethanol and double distilled water (DDW) as controls. The SAS statistical software was used to analyze the data.

Results: Danggui was found to be much more toxic to all cancer cell lines tested than to normal fibroblasts. There was a significant negative dose-effect relationship between Danggui and cancer cell viability. Average viability of MCF-7 was 69.5%, 18.4%, 5.7%, 5.7%, and 5.0% of control for Danggui doses 0.07, 0.14, 0.21, 0.32, and 0.64 ug/ul, respectively, with a Ptrend < 0.0001. Half maximal inhibitory dose (ID50) of Danggui for cancer cell lines MCF-7, CaSki, SiHa and CRL-7368 was 0.10, 0.09, 0.10 and 0.07 ug/ul, respectively. For the normal fibroblasts, ID50 was 0.58 ug/ul. At a dose of 0.32 ug/ul, Danggui killed over 90% of the cells in each cancer cell line, but at the same dose, only 12.3% of the normal HTB-125 cells were killed. Revertants per plate of TA 100 decreased with the introduction of increasing doses of Danggui extracts with a Ptrend < 0.0001 when UV light was used as a mutagen. There was no difference in revertants per plate between ethanol and DDW control groups.

Conclusions:  Danggui could be used as a safe and effective adjuvant therapy to prevent and treat breast and cervical cancers. Anti-cancer effects may be due to its anti-mutagenicity. Danggui should be investigated as a potential adjuvant anti-cancer therapy for women’s cancer treatment and prevention of recurrence.

Key Words: Angelica sinensis, Danggui, cancer, women’s reproductive disorders

Thursday, 20 June 2013

Position Description for Eberly Professor of STEM Education, 4/4/13

Position Description for Eberly Professor of STEM Education, 4/4/13 The Eberly College of Arts and Sciences of West Virginia University seeks nominations and applications for the Eberly Professor of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Education. The start date is negotiable and can be as soon as January 2014. The tenure home will be in a department/program in the Eberly College (http://eberly.wvu.edu/); however, much of this position’s effort will be devoted toward growing the Flexible Education Research Network (FERN), a trans-disciplinary, STEM education initiative identified by the University as one of five areas for strategic investment. The initiative includes the Statler College of Engineering and Mineral Resources, the Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Design, and the College of Education and Human Services; over 70 faculty members have outreach, research, and funding in STEM education, and each college has designated resources, including current faculty time and planned new hires to FERN. The appointment will be made at the full professor or advanced associate professor rank. A doctoral degree is required in a STEM or STEM-education related discipline, as well as a record of teaching and scholarship that would qualify the candidate for a tenured appointment in the home department as a full professor or advanced associate professor. Area of specialization is open, and the committee invites applications from persons with a track record in trans-disciplinary STEM education or broadening participation in STEM fields. Trans-disciplinary work blends approaches from multiple disciplines to address research questions. Applicants who have worked primarily within one discipline should provide evidence indicating potential for success at engaging with faculty in other disciplines. The position involves administrative leadership, teaching, and scholarship that will advance FERN’s research, education and outreach agenda. The percent of effort related to administration, teaching, and scholarship is negotiable and administrative support will be provided by an executive director to manage operations, as well as support staff. The position includes significant service and leadership responsibilities, including: mentoring other STEM education faculty members; leading collaborative, trans-disciplinary research projects across departmental and college boundaries; and strategizing to identify priority areas, build coalitions, and move a research agenda forward. The successful applicant will communicate with many types of audiences, using a variety of media, in order to promote the importance of trans-disciplinary collaboration to broaden participation in STEM. West Virginia University is the flagship institution of the state of West Virginia and is classified by the Carnegie Foundation as a doctoral high research university. As the primary land-grant institution in West Virginia with teaching, research, and engagement at the forefront of its mission, it attracts over $152 million in externally funded projects annually. Located in Morgantown, WV, WVU is within easy traveling distance of Washington, D.C. to the east, Pittsburgh to the north, and Cleveland and Columbus to the west. Morgantown has been ranked as the Number One Small City in America by BizJournals, and 5th Best Small Metro by Forbes. The Eberly College has 400 full-time faculty and 100 classified staff in 30 academic departments, programs, and centers in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. These include tenure track faculty in STEM education research in the departments of Mathematics (6), Biology (1), and Chemistry (1); as well as promotable non-tenure track STEM teaching faculty in the departments of Physics, Geology and Geography, Mathematics, Biology and Chemistry. Applications should include a letter of interest, a CV, addresses of at least three references, and a statement of research plans showing trans-disciplinary perspectives for STEM education and broadening participation in STEM, and should be submitted electronically at https://fs9.formsite.com/kasijackson/form11/secure_index.html. For more information, or to make a nomination, contact Dr. Kasi Jackson, Associate Professor, Women’s and Gender Studies, at kasi.jackson@mail.wvu.edu. The screening process will begin on August 16, 2013, and continue until a successful candidate has been found. WVU is responsive to the needs of dual career couples, committed to building a multicultural work force and strongly encourages women, racial/ethnic/gender minorities, persons with disabilities, and covered veterans to apply. Therefore the search committee invites applications from any person who through research, teaching, or service supports the success of underrepresented groups and thereby contributes to the inclusivity and excellence of the academic community. WVU is the recipient of an NSF ADVANCE award to recruit, retain and promote women in STEM (http://advance.wvu.edu).

Wednesday, 19 June 2013

Tuesday, 18 June 2013

Research gate citations this week

Cheryl, 3 of your publications were recently cited. New citations Ethnomedicines used in Trinidad and Tobago for urinary problems and diabetes mellitus. Cited in: Kalanchoe tubiflora extract inhibits cell proliferation by affecting the mitotic apparatus... Authors: Yi-Jen Hsieh,Ming-Yeh Yang,Yann-Lii Leu BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 09/2012 12(1):149. View https://www.researchgate.net/publication/230827840_Kalanchoe_tubiflora_extract_inhibits_cell_proliferation_by_affecting_the_mitotic_apparatus?ev=pub_cit_inc Ethnomedicines used in Trinidad and Tobago for urinary problems and diabetes mellitus. Cited in: A brief study of toxic effects of some medicinal herbs on kidney. Authors: Mohammad Asif Advanced biomedical research 01/2012 1:44. View Comparison of plants used for skin and stomach problems in Trinidad and Tobago with Asian ... Cited in: Biological activities and medicinal properties of Cajanus cajan (L) Millsp. Authors: Dilipkumar Pal,Pragya Mishra,Neetu Sachan Journal of Advanced Pharmaceutical Technology & Research 10/2011 2(4):207-14. View

Monday, 17 June 2013

AHVMA Meetings

AHVMA Meetings Registration for the Hotel and Conference Print Email Online registration for the Hotel for the 2013 Annual AHVMA Conference is now available, at the Kansas City Marriott Downtown, 200 West 12th Street, Kansas City,Missouri 64105 http://www.thecvc.com/cvc/CVC+in+Kansas+City/Housing-information/ArticleStandard/Article/detail/656803?contextCategoryId=48915 Read more: Schedule of lectures and speakers Speaker Abstracts Print Email Karen Shaw Becker, DVM 711 Almar Pkwy Bourbonnais, IL 60914 Lecture Titles (50 min. each) Helping Clients Understand Raw Food for Pets: Part 1 Helping Clients Understand Raw Food for Pets: Part 2 Nutrition, Performance and Longevity Becoming a Proactive Technician Finding the Perfect Food for Every patient Signe Beebe, DVM, CVA 5524 Elvas Avenue Sacramento, CA 95819 Lecture titles (50 min. each) An Introduction to Chinese Veterinary Herbal Medicine An Introduction to Veterinary Acupuncture Classic Chinese Tonic Herbal Formulas Treatment of Congestive Heart Failure with Chinese Herbs Treatment of Feline Chronic Renal Failure Lecture Abstracts An Introduction to Chinese Veterinary Herbal Medicine This lecture is for veterinarians with little to no knowledge of Chinese herbal medicine. A brief history, nomenclature, classification, processing and preparations of Chinese herbs will be discussed. The characteristics of Chinese herbs (taste, thermal property, direction, channel affiliation) toxicity and safety issues will be reviewed. The clinical applications of Chinese herbal medicine, including dosing recommendations and concurrent use of herbal medicines and pharmaceutical drugs, will be discussed along with the current status and future direction of research in Chinese herbal medicine. An Introduction to Veterinary Acupuncture Veterinary acupuncture is the most common and fastest growing CAVM modality in the US and internationally. Acupuncture can be safely used along with or in conjunction with conventional medicine, to treat many different species of domestic and nondomestic animals, fish and reptiles. Clinical research demonstrates the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of animals and humans. Acupuncture can be used to treat both acute and chronic disease, and can also be used as a preventative medicine. Best results can be obtained when it is practiced in accordance with Chinese medicine theory. Classic Chinese Tonic Herbal Formulas Chinese herbal tonic formulas are the most commonly used category of Chinese herbs in veterinary medicine. This seminar will introduce classical Chinese herbal tonic formulas that have been safely and effectively used to treat common veterinary disorders in the dog and cat. The six subcategories of Chinese tonic herbal formulas and their traditional therapeutic functions will be discussed, along with a representative formula within each subcategory. Clinical studies and research on the selected herbal formulas will be presented. Treatment of Congestive Heart Failure with Chinese Herbs A Chinese medicine approach to the treatment and management of congestive heart failure (CHF) is valuable in cases where Western medication is contraindicated, or ineffective. This lecture focuses on the treatment of CHF due to valvular disease and cardiomyopathy from a Chinese medical perspective. TCM etiology, pattern differentiation and treatment will be discussed. The use of herbal medicine will be highlighted; acupuncture point recommendations and the concurrent use of conventional cardiac medications will also be addressed. The most common secondary disorder associated with CHF, pulmonary edema, will also be briefly reviewed and treatment recommendations discussed. Treatment of Feline Chronic Renal Failure Chronic renal failure in the cat can result from normal aging, congenital defects, exogenous pathogenic factors, toxicity, adverse drug reaction, chronic disease, neoplasia, urolithiasis and immune-mediated disease. From a Chinese medicine perspective, CRF is most often the result of normal aging associated with deficiency of Kidney Qi, Yin and/or Yang. The Chinese medical treatment of feline CRF, including herbal therapy, acupuncture, and food therapy using a species-appropriate diet, will be discussed. A brief discussion of anemia secondary to CRF, and how to treat it appropriately, will also be included. Paula Jo (P.J.) Broadfoot DVM 6509 Alma Hwy Van Buren, AR 72956 Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) Nutrigenomic/ Nutrigenetics/ Epigenetics and Mechanisms of Repair/ Regeneration: Part 1 Nutrigenomic/ Nutrigenetics/ Epigenetics and Mechanisms of Repair/ Regeneration: Part 2 Thymus Therapy- Changing Health with Immunomodulation An Introduction to Homotoxocology: Bioregulatory Medicine Lecture Abstracts Nutrigenomic/ Nutrigenetics/ Epigenetics And Mechanisms of Repair/ Regeneration (Parts 1 and 2) For decades, nutritional science has been focused on identifying nutrients, such as proteins, vitamins and minerals, and understanding their role in biological processes. Understanding how these nutrients reinforce health and thereby prevent diseases resulting from their deficiencies, has been a major objective. New scientific endeavors seek to characterize the response to specific nutrients and how that can impact health by altering specific genes and their genetic expression. Nutrigenomics will revolutionize how we manage health and performance. In the nutritional field, epigenetics is exceptionally important, because nutrients and bioactive food components can modify epigenetic phenomena and alter the expression of genes at the transcriptional level. Thymus Therapy- Changing Health with Immunomodulation Treatment with thymic hormone, particularly in combination with therapies that complement its function, including Homotoxicology, may contribute toward healing in multiple ways: prevention or elimination of the negative impact of shock, stimulation of the immune system to control infections, and acceleration of the repair mechanism, starting with stimulation of fibroblasts. Augmented with other therapeutics known to enhance thymic function, reduce inflammation and biomodulate the immune system, there are endless possibilities for utilization of this valuable treatment option. An Introduction to Homotoxocology: Bioregulatory Medicine Homotoxicology is a modern variant of classic homeopathy, utilizing dilutional medicines. This discipline, developed over 100 yrs ago, by Hans Heinrich Reckeweg, is devoted to guiding body defense and repair mechanisms back to a normal status, by engaging bioregulatory loops toward homeostasis. The range and power of complex formulas is impressive, and the therapy is gentle but effective, and the veterinary use of this modality is growing apace. Christina Chambreau, DVM, CVH 908 Cold Bottom Road Sparks, MD 21152 Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) An Introduction to Homeopathy: Powerful Healer and Gentle, Too (Intro day) Trouble in Your Practice? Homeopathic Principles to the Rescue (AVH Track) Homeopathy in Hospice Care (AVH Track) Training Clients to Keep Their Animals Healthy at Home: Part 1 (tech track) Training Clients to Keep Their Animals Healthy at Home: Part 2 (tech track) Lecture Abstracts An Introduction to Homeopathy: Powerful Healer and Gentle, Too Homeopathy is a time tested alternative modality with simple principles that can help your patients stay healthy. It can also treat any type of disease. Learn the history, basic principles and potential for deep cures. Leave with knowledge of homeopathic remedies you can use tomorrow in your practice. Trouble in Your Practice? Homeopathic Principles to the Rescue The basic homeopathic skills of case taking and evaluating the results of treatment can make a huge difference in the happiness of your staff and clients, and boost your bottom line. Learn practical steps to have your homeopathic, holistic or conventional practice thrive. Cured homeopathic animal cases will demonstrate the process of “curing’ your practice. Homeopathy in Hospice Care Homeopathy is a wonderful modality for hospice patients. It is easy to administer, so less stressful for the clients. Learn the many remedies that can alleviate the common hospice symptoms – ulcers, GIT, weakness, emotions and more. Learn the potential for homeopathy to be deeply curative so patients begin to recover to a point that they have passed out of the category of hospice and may live for many more years. Training Clients to Keep Their Animals Healthy at Home (Parts 1 and 2) Want animals at your practice to be easier to handle? Want clients to have some methods to help distressed animals after hours? Learn how to create a client education program that can be used one on one or offered as a class. Train clients to do mini-physicals and keep records of changes from any treatments they try. Create or make available videos demonstrating how to administer treatments. Help clients choose from the wide range of flower essences and essential oils available. Create Reiki training classes at your clinic. Think outside the box for how to have your practice be the best it can be for the clients and animals in it. Roger M Clemmons, DVM, PhD, CVA, CVFT 2015 SW 16th Ave, VH-44 PO Box 100126 Gainesville, FL Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) GSDM: Past, Present & Future Vestibular Disease: Integrative Approach to Diagnosis and Treatment Siezures: How to Help the refractory patient Integrative nuerology: case presentations Inflammatory Brain Disease:Integrative therapy CNS Neoplasia: TCVM Diagnosis and Treatment Lecture Abstracts GSDM: Past, Present & Future Degenerative Myelopathy was first described as a specific neurologic disorder in 1973. Since then, limited insights into the nature of the disease have been made. Recent data includes the use of genetic changes to help in diagnosis, but these tests are being seen with increasing skepticism. Future research into neuroregenerative peptides, immunosuppressants and stem cells offers the greatest hope for recovery. One new metabolic pathway may play a role in the disease and controlling this pathway might provide new directions for treatment. Medication, exercise and physical therapy, herbal supplementation and acupuncture help patients live a good quality of life. Vestibular Disease: Integrative Approach to Diagnosis & Treatment All veterinary species suffer from various forms of vestibular disease. Although there are a number of diseases which can affect the vestibular system, generally we can break them down anatomically into peripheral and central disorders. With certain exceptions, peripheral diseases bear a better prognosis in most species than central vestibular disease. Partially due to this concern, vestibular diseases represent a large number of neurologic referrals. TCVM diagnosis and treatment can help differentiate the potential causes and reduce symptoms in patients with vestibular disease. Seizures: How to Help the Refractory Patient Seizures from TCM are either excess or deficiency. There are three of each. The excesses are invasion of pathogens with accumulation of wind, phlegm and heat in the interior or stagnation which is locally excessive. The wind-phlegm syndrome usually has an acute onset with seizures. The phlegm-fire syndrome also has sudden seizures (which probably represents encephalitis-related seizures). The third form of excess is Blood Stagnation (which probably represents acquired epilepsy). There is often a history of head injury. The deficiencies represent liver blood, liver and kidney yin and kidney jing deficiencies. Liver Blood deficiency has chronic seizures (like inherited epilepsy) and may have dry or burnt hair and anemia. Liver and Kidney Yin deficiency also causes chronic seizures, but the nose and mouth are fry, the tongue is red while the pulse remains weak and thready. The seizures also happen often late afternoon or at night. The final deficiency is for seizures that occur before a year of age due to kidney jing problems. Regulating refractory seizures may require combinations of Western medications, TCVM herbal support and use of acupuncture including bead implantation. Unfortunately, there are is little help with Western herbs; however, TCVM herbal medications can be very effective. Integrative Neurology: Case Presentations The material presented in this lecture will be based upon case material with various neurologic conditions requiring and integrative approach to diagnosis and treatment. In some cases, surgery will be recommended along with rehabilitation, while other cases represent either choices made because of the owner’s wishes or because the integrative approach offers the best chances for a good outcome. The cases will be presented with video and clinical data so that the Western diagnosis and TCVM evaluation can be confirmed through appropriate tests. The process of the patient evaluation including location of the lesion, DAMNITV scheme and final diagnosis and treatment will be discussed. Inflammatory Brain Disease: Integrative Therapy Like Cancer, Inflammatory Brain Diseases are on the rise. These represent a complex group of diseases which can be characterized partly based upon the anatomic structures of the central nervous system which are affected. As such, they can be classified as the meningitides, encephalitides or the myelitides or various combinations thereof. Some of these conditions occur secondary to infectious causes, but many have no discernible etiologic agent. Of these, Granulomatous Meningoencephalitis (GME) and Meningoencephalitis of Unknown Cause (MUC) are the most common. The main difference relates to prognosis, since true cases of GME usually progress rapidly and lead to death within 3-6 months even with aggressive therapy. On the other hand, MUC can be treated (if not cured) for extended periods of time. Additional medication such as a modern TCVM herbal formula (Damp Heat Mind Formula, Jing Tang herbal, Reddick, FL 800-891-1986) and a special therapeutic vitamin supplement (AntioxQ-CB, Westlab Pharmacy, Gainesville, FL 800-4WESTLA) can also help and sometimes replace the need for conventional anti-inflammatory medications. CNS Neoplasia: TCVM Diagnosis and Treatment Reducing risk factors for cancer, eating a properly balanced diet (free of pesticides and preservatives), drinking pure water, providing appropriate anti-oxidants, vitamins and minerals, and exercising regularly can help prevent cancer. Once cancer has been found, additional supportive measures are needed. Cancer cells utilize carbohydrates for fuel and compete for the body for amino acids. However, these cancer cells do not metabolize fats. Some data suggests that high fat diets can help the patient overcome the effects of cancer and even reduce cancer expansion. A number of herbal products can stimulate the immune system to attack cancer or block the mediators which the tumor uses to spread to other areas of the body, mediators which the tumor needs to survive. The following is a guide to the integrative treatment of cancer, using those compounds where there is scientific data to support their use in cancer management, helping the patient survive the disease. Joseph Demers, DVM I will discuss many topics of Veterinary Homotoxicology. I will present what is new in Homotoxicology with products availability and use of these products in the first part of my presentation. Then, I will discuss how to address inflammation and degeneration with the use of Homotozicology. I will present the use of Homotoxicology Injection Therapy with additional ways to combine these therapies in Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine ideas. Finally, I will discuss different homotoxicolgy products from many companies that can be incorporated into the practice of Holistic Veterinary Medicine. Constance DiNatale, DVM 742 Clay St Winter Park, FL 32789 (work) Lecture/Lab Title Food therapy for the non-TCVM practitioner Lecture Abstract Food therapy for the non-TCVM practitioner (50 Min.) This class is for veterinarians who do not have a background in Chinese medical theory, but are interested in helping clients choose appropriate foods and supplements for their pets. Basic energetics of foods will be discussed, and supplements will be described in a way to help the clinician understand why what might be a panacea for one patient may be harmful to another. Lab Abstract Food therapy for the non-TCVM practitioner (2 Two-hour labs) In this interactive lab we will explore the world of Food therapy. Dr. DiNatale will demonstrate how to prepare and cook the foods while explaining their uses. The lab will be demonstrations of ideas discussed in the class. Participants will taste the foods and experience their energies. When you see how easy and helpful food therapy is you will be recommending it for all your clients. W. Jean Dodds, DVM 11561 Salinaz Avenue Garden Grove, CA 92843 Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) Top 10 Facts You Aren’t Told About Vaccines: Part 1 Top 10 Facts You Aren’t Told About Vaccines: Part 2 Functional Foods: The New Paradigm Based on Nutrigenomics Lecture Abstracts Top 10 Facts You Aren’t Told About Vaccines (Parts 1 and 2) Now that we’ve had more than a decade of scientifically based national guidelines and policy about companion animal vaccines, why is a large cohort of our profession still reluctant to embrace this knowledge? After all, the national policies of the AAHA, AVMA, and AAFP are all based on scientific facts and challenge study data. Do vaccine industry representatives fail to inform veterinarians about the duration of immunity and true regional and local needs for some types of vaccines? Are the risks of as well as benefits of today’s vaccines discussed? Function Foods: The New Paradigm Based on Nutrigenomics Nutrigenomics studies the molecular relationships between nutrition and the response of genes in promoting health, i.e. functional foods. Different diets alter gene expression, and specific nutrients affect the body responses in a form defined as the “molecular dietary signature”. Applying nutrigenomic principles in formulating diets identifies the best food for an individual. Individualized diets are proven in dogs for liver cleansing, arthritis, and obesity. Certain diet-regulated genes play a role in the onset, incidence, progression, and/or severity of chronic diseases. Thus, dietary interventions based on an individual’s “signature” are used to prevent, mitigate or cure chronic diseases. Shelley R. Epstein, V.M.D. 828 Philadelphia Pike Wilmington, DE 19809 www.WilmingtonAnimalHospital.com Lecture Title (50 Min. Each) Updates on Research in Veterinary Homeopathy: Part 1 Updates on Research in Veterinary Homeopathy: Part 2 Updates on Research in Veterinary Homeopathy: Part 3 Lecture Abstract Updates on Research in Veterinary Homeopathy (Parts 1 – 3) This overview of clinical trials and other papers in homeopathy will emphasize case series, case reports, and clinical trials in veterinary homeopathy. We will look at food animal health as well as specific conditions in small animal medicine. The challenges of clinical trials in farm animals versus pets will be addressed. We will also look at updates in basic science including exciting findings in nanoscience. Dr. Barbara Fougere, BSc (Hons), MODT, BHSc (Herb Med), CVA (IVAS), CVBM, CVCP, CMAVA PO Box 474 Rozelle 2039 NSW 292 Lyons Rd Russell Lea 2046 NSW Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) Case Studies in Naturopathic Oncology for Aggressive Cancer Materia Medica of the Musculoskeletal System – A Western Approach An Introduction to Western Herbology: Getting Started with Western Herbs Lecture Abstracts Case Studies in Naturopathic Oncology for Aggressive cancer With a grave prognosis for aggressive cancers, should you even try? Case studies using natural medicine illustrate longevity and quality of life can be achieved way beyond expectations. Case studies illustrate key principles in palliation and helping patients to live successfully with cancer. Materia Medica of the Musculoskeletal System - A Western Approach Learn 5 key herbs that you can integrate into veterinary practice as part of your multimodality approach to treating osteoarthritis and musculoskeletal disease. What herbs work best for different conditions and how they work from a biomedical perspective. And for patients on NSAIDS what you can do to minimise potential side effects. An Introduction to Western Herbology: Getting Started with Western Herbs This introductory lecture explores the use of herbs in Veterinary practice. Why bother? What about using herbs and drugs together? What can you use right now safely and effectively? And finally where’s the evidence? Spend an hour and be inspired! Michele Gaspar, DVM, DABVP (Feline), MA 777 W. Covell Davis, CA 95616 Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) Cats Who Rock Telling Our Stories:The Role For Narrative Medicine in Veterinary Clinical Practice Buddha, Freud and Neuroimaging: Implications for 21st Century Practice Lecture Abstracts Cats Who Rock Urolithiasis in cats has changed markedly over the past 20 years from struvite cystoliths to calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis and ureterolithiasis. This lecture will include a discussion of calcium homeostasis, the role of changing feline diets and provide participants with no ways of thinking about an increasingly common and perplexing issue in cats. Telling Our Stories: The Role For Narrative Medicine in Veterinary Clinical Practice Narrative Medicine, telling personal stories of the relationship between the clinician and patient, is an increasingly popular tool in human medical schools and clinical practice. Narrative Medicine affords introspection and observership among clinicians, increasing empathy and providing meaning within the clinical context. This lecture will introduce Narrative Medicine as it is understood and taught in human medicine and present avenues for pursuing this within veterinary medicine. Buddha, Freud and Neuroimaging: Implications for 21st Century Clinical Practice Recent advances in neurobiology/neuroimaging are increasingly supporting Buddhist psychology of mind theory and psychoanalytic paradigms regarding the building blocks of excellent clinical practice: Compassion for self and others; competence; and insight into our own motivations and work. Veterinarians have traditionally lagged behind other health care professionals (notably physicians) in incorporating these insights into clinical practice. This lecture will present some of the most current research on how by utilizing techniques, such as mindfulness and object relations theory, clinical practice can become more satisfying and effective. Terri Symonds Grow 2391 South Dove Street Alexandria, VA 22314 Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) Developing Commercial Partnerships and Resources: Part 1 Developing Commercial Partnerships and Resources: Part 2 Lecture Abstracts Developing Commercial Partnerships and Resources: Part 1 Today’s pet owner has access to an array of animal care services and products through a variety of channels. This presentation offers a new perspective on using select channels, in particular holistic pet stores, as a valued resource for you, your clients and as an ally to your veterinary practice. Basics of consumer behavior, buying trends and a look at your client from behind the pet store's counter may give you new insights into working with your clients. Developing Commercial Partnerships and Resources: Part 2 In this session, discussions on strategies, along with case studies, will demonstrate the potential of developing a positive working relationship with qualified pet stores and valued resources. Discover how these partnerships can support your clients through trade knowledge, product changes and viability, care continuity and even enhanced veterinary product positioning, co-marketing opportunities and quality referrals. Betsy Hershey, DVM, DACVIM (Oncology), CVA 2260 West Glendale Ave Phoenix, AZ 85021 integrativeveterinaryoncology.com Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) Ozone Therapy Part I Ozone Therapy Part II Pain Management Part I Pain Management Part II Eastern vs. Western Philosophies on Cancer Acupuncture for the Veterinary Cancer Patient Lecture Abstracts OZONE THERAPY IN VETERINARY MEDICINE PART I The first part of this 2 lecture series will discuss the scientific basis for medical ozone therapy including potential side effects and benefits. The different types and uses of ozone therapy will be discussed including major autohemotherapy, minor autohemotherapy, rectal and bladder insufflation, and Prolozone therapy. OZONE THERAPY IN VETERINARY MEDICINE PART II The second part of this 2 lecture series will discuss clinical cases to demonstrate the benefits of the different type of ozone therapy including combination ozone and ultraviolet light irradiation for inflammatory and auto-immune conditions, minor autohemotherapy for allergic skin disease and bladder insufflation for alleviation of symptoms of bladder cancer. PAIN MANAGEMENT IN VETERINARY PATIENT PART I This lecture will focus on pain management in dogs and cats for non cancer conditions. Both conventional and alternative modalities for pain management will be discussed with focus on cold laser therapy and acupuncture. PAIN MANAGEMENT IN VETERINARY PATIENT PART II This lecture will focus on pain management in the cancer patient. Management of pain in the cancer patient is an important component of cancer treatment. Pain can cause many quality of life concerns included decreased appetite, diminished ability to fight the cancer and diminished ability to tolerate treatments. The type and causes of pain in the veterinary cancer patient will be discussed as well as how to identify the symptoms of pain in animals. Both conventional and alternative methods of managing pain will be discussed. EASTERN VS WESTERN PHILOSOPHIES ON THE CAUSE, TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF CANCER This lecture will discuss the cause of cancer from conventional western and eastern philosophies. These paradigms will be explored in the treatment and prevention of cancer and how to integrate these philosophies into a comprehensive approach to cancer treatment in companion animals. ACUPUNCTURE FOR THE VETERINARY CANCER PATIENT Acupuncture is an invaluable treatment to managing the pet with cancer. It is increasingly more common for owners to request acupuncture and herbs/supplements as part of their pet’s cancer therapy. Acupuncture may be used with western therapies to optimize treatment results. The following benefits of acupuncture for the veterinary cancer patient will be discussed: management of pain; immunity, alleviation of side effects of treatment, alleviation of symptoms of cancer, and improved response to therapy. Doug Knueven, DVM, CVA, CVC 131 DeHaven Road Beaver Falls, PA 15010 Lecture Title (50 Min.) An Introduction to Holistic Veterinary Medicine: The Wave of the Future Lecture Abstract An Introduction to Holistic Veterinary Medicine: An Integrative Approach This lecture looks at why pet owners are attracted to holistic methods. We will explore the jargon associated with holistic medicine and give a summary of the holistic philosophy. We’ll compare and contrast the science behind alternative medicine as opposed to conventional medicine. Finally, we’ll see a case example of how alternative medicine can be integrated with conventional care. Patricia Maria Kortekaas, PT 2780 Emerald Street Eugene, OR 97403 Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) An Introduction to Veterinary Osteopathy: Treating the Whole Body Through Manual Therapy Osteopathy from a Vascular and a Lymphatic Prospective! Shoulder Injuries: Getting to the Heart of it! Getting it Out of Your (Portal) System: Vascular Dynamics of the Liver and Associated Organs Lecture Abstracts An Introduction to Veterinary Osteopathy: Treating the Whole Body Through Manual Therapy Andrew Taylor Still, MD, DO, developed osteopathy in the 1870’s while looking for definitive methods to cure and prevent all that ailed his patients. He discovered that if he could correct the body’s structural disturbances, the body could heal itself and function normally. Many people think of osteopathy as being used primarily for problems with the spine, joints, and muscles, but it is also very helpful for issues with virtually any part of the body, including the internal organs, the neurological connections, the myofascial and vascular systems. Many practitioners find that osteopathic techniques become an invaluable part of their treatment toolbox. Osteopathy from a Vascular and a Lymphatic Prospective! Osteopathy is a “hands-on” approach that encourages the body to heal itself through using the body’s own intrinsic forces, rhythms, and corrective mechanisms. Discussed will be the protection hierarchy of the body: circulation – neurology – organs –endocrine and musculoskeletal systems. One classical principle of osteopathy is that “a healthy state exists as long as there is normal flow of body fluids (blood, lymph and cerebro-spinal) and nerve activity.” New manual therapy techniques utilizing innate body rhythms to optimize vascular and lymphatic flow will be addressed. We will also look at the emerging importance of treating the “fascial web” (the entire extracellular matrix, ECM, including the cells that create and maintain the ECM) that envelope all of the cells in the body. Shoulder Injuries: Getting to the Heart of it! Many forelimb lamenesses appear to originate from the shoulder while in fact the primary problem is often elsewhere, such as a vascular, neurological, or fascial dysfunction. Using vascular and myofascial concepts from osteopathy, we will look at traumas from a new perspective! Are altered shoulder mechanics and tendon problems may be secondary to vascular restrictions of local blood vessels and/or myofascial restrictions (“Thoracic Outlet Syndrome”)? Might these be the CORE problems of many of our common, persistent shoulder injuries? We will look at these issues and how this new knowledge would alter our rehabilitation concepts and protocols. Getting it Out of Your (Portal) System: Vascular Dynamics of the Liver and Associated Organs Optimal liver, spleen, pancreatic and intestinal function are essential for a healthy body, no matter what the type of medicine you practice. In Chinese medicine, the liver regulates the movement of QI (energy) and blood, is a very important function. Liver QI stagnation is a common diagnosis in both animals and people. Do fluid dynamics play a major role in stagnation of the liver and its associated portal system? We will look at applying visceral vascular reflexes and other manual therapy techniques to treatment of the organs/vessels associated with the portal system. Beverly London, DVM 2039 Arbor Meadows Dr. DeWitt, MI 48820 Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) Holistic Treatment of Equine Gastrointestinal Ulcers Heavy Metal Toxicity and Chronic Renal Failure in the Horse Complete Recovery of Equine Osteochondrosis Dessicans without Surgical Intervention Lecture Abstracts Holistic Treatment of Equine Gastrointestinal Ulcers Equine gastric ulcers are relatively common compared to or in conjunction with other metabolic issues. This presentation will discuss the two most common causes of equine gastric ulcers, as well as why gastric ulcers occur, diagnostic options and the treatment/cure of gastric ulcers. Gastrointestinal pathophysiology will be reviewed in order to explain the cell inflammatory response to the two most common causes of equine gastric ulcers. Heavy Metal Toxicity and Chronic Renal Failure in the Horse There are several causes of chronic renal failure in horses. Many times renal dysfunction is diagnosed as idiopathic chronic renal failure. This presentation will explore possible etiologies of chronic renal failure with a focus on heavy metal toxicities, renal physiology, and holistic treatment of chronic renal failure using nutritional supplements. Complete Recovery of Equine Osteochondrosis Dessicans without Surgical Intervention Developmental orthopedic disease (DOD) is always a factor to rule out in young horses exhibiting signs of lameness or negative behavior during training. This discussion will cover a brief overview of DOD lesions, radiography of DOD lesions, and a holistic approach for treatment of DOD. This presentation will include a nine month case study of a horse diagnosed with an osteochondrosis dessicans (OCD) lesion in a carpal bone. Laurie McCauley, DVM, CCRT 1440 E. Belvidere Rd Grayslake, IL 60030 Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) Therapeutic Lasers: Do they work and what is the research to prove it Therapeutic Lasers: How do I get the best effects from the machine I have (or may get in the future) The Complete Musculoskeletal exam: More then you were taught in school Neurological Rehabilitation - The most rewarding thing on earth Exercises For The Puppy, Athletic, and Geriatric Dog Lecture Abstracts Therapeutic Lasers: Do they work and what is the research to prove it I hear Therapeutic lasers are the newest and coolest thing since sliced bread, but do they really work? They do. Review the research that shows what they work for and when they should and should not be used. Learn what we know about how light energy can have significant effects in the body at a cellular level as well as at a tissue level. Therapeutic Lasers: How do I get the best effects from the machine I have (or may get in the future) Each company says they have the best wavelength and frequency, what is each one for and how do I use each one for the best effect. Learn how to best utilize each machine to its best ability. Learn how to hold and apply the probe for the effect you want on specific tissue. Safety for the individuals in the room, including the patient, will be addressed. The Complete Musculoskeletal Exam: More than you were taught in school Take a now look at how to do your musculoskeletal exam, learning new ways to diagnose some of the things you see but don't find. Learn how to diagnose Iliopsoas strains, palpate trigger points, immune issues by looking at toes, a kinder gentler way to look for hip laxity, a logical way to evaluate gait, and so many other cool things. Guaranteed everyone will learn something new. Neurological Rehabilitation - The most rewarding thing on earth Paresis and paralysis can be devastating, but getting those babies to walk again is the most heart warming thing in the world. Learn secrets and tricks to get your patients to do the best they can by putting the exercises in the right order to turn on all the correct muscles on before you ask them to try to walk. Learn tricks on how to prevent continence from being the reason for euthanasia, and learn how to give a true prognosis depending on where they are at. Exercises for the Puppy, Athletic, and Geriatric Dog Gangly puppies need exercises to help proprioception and muscle development. Adult dogs and athletes need to work on speed and strength as well as to be challenged intellectually, which has different levels depending on the breed. Geriatric patients need balance and then resume strengthening with easier and more gentle exercises. Learn how to asses your patients needs and create an exercise plan to start where they are at and then take them to where you want them to be. Mushtaq A. Memon, BVSc, MSc, PhD PO Box 646610 Pullman, Washington 99164-6610 Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) Exploring International Opportunities in Holistic Veterinary Medicine: Part 1 - Introduction to Fulbright Opportunities Exploring International Opportunities in Holistic Veterinary Medicine: Part 2 – The Fulbright Experience Opportunities for Holistic veterinary practitioner working with academic institutions Lecture Abstracts Exploring International Opportunities in Holistic Veterinary Medicine sponsored by Fulbright Program Part 1: Introduction to Fulbright opportunities – Fulbright program founded in 1946, and sponsored by the US Department of State is the largest international exchange program offering opportunities for faculty and professionals to undertake teaching and research worldwide. Most of the Holistic veterinary modalities have originated from different parts of the world, and the Fulbright program provides outstanding opportunities for the US veterinarian to explore (research) the undiscovered approaches to healing. The Fulbright Core scholar program offers up to two semester international opportunities, whereas the Fulbright Specialists may visit for 3-6 weeks to other country. Various international opportunities under Fulbright program will be discussed. Exploring International Opportunities in Holistic Veterinary Medicine Part 2: The Fulbright Experience The Fulbright application process can be over-whelming for an applicant. How to prepare an application and deal with time line constraints, what should and should not be emphasized in the application, an inside look at the application review process, and personal and professional opportunities and challenges associated with accepting a Fulbright scholarship will be discussed. Opportunities for Holistic veterinary practitioner working with academic institutions One of the main hurdle having Holistic veterinary modalities accepted by the US traditional veterinary profession is the limited publications of the research findings and successful outcome of clinical cases. Veterinary practitioners attending large number of cases and the academicians with access to laboratory analysis and training/background in scientific writing provide an outstanding collaborative opportunity of mutual interest and benefit. Examples for collaborative opportunities will be discussed. Richard Palmquist, DVM, et al 721 Centinela Ave. Inglewood, CA 90302 Lecture / Workshop Title (50 Min. Lecture / 2 Hr Workshop) Expanding our literature by writing sound case reports Lecture Abstract Expanding our literature by writing sound case reports In this three hour section we will spend one hour discussing how case reports are vital to generating evidence in CAVM and how to turn a great case into an amazing case report. The second hour is a workshop. Bring your case materials and the leaders will help you turn them into case reports. Lynn S. Peck, DVM, MS, cICAK 2600-404 SW Williston Road Gainesville, FL 32608 Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) Subtle Neuromuscular Weakness in Horses is Common: Ten Conditions to Look for in Everyday Practice and How to Correct Them in 10 Minutes or Less Teaching Self-Healing Techniques to Horses Detoxing Horses: a Top Ten List of Common Chemicals, Where They Come From, Where They Go, What They Do, and How to Get Them Out Safely Lecture Abstracts Subtle Neuromuscular Weakness in Horses is Common: Ten Conditions to Look for in Everyday Practice and How to Correct Them in 10 Minutes or Less Approximately 100 percent of horses evaluated in my practice have subtle, multiple, neuromuscular weaknesses associated with injury, meridian blockages, chemical toxins or abnormalities in autonomic nervous system (ANS) function. Some occur in predictable patterns; others are random. Uncorrected, they can lead to performance problems/inability to perform specific exercises or movements; subtle lameness, chronic pain, organ dysfunction. They can also block the body’s ability to respond to treatment. Correcting the conditions underlying these neuromuscular weaknesses, using simple techniques, can resolve some weaknesses and their related symptoms almost instantly, while enabling rapid progress and ANS function improvement in others. Teaching Self-Healing Techniques to Horses Horses can easily learn to correct some of their own neuromusculoskeletal problems such as cranial faults, hyoid displacements, and limb subluxations; energetic issues such as meridian blockages; as well as learn sound-based treatments. This work is being developed using applied kinesiology techniques and Pain Trace™ electrical potential testing. Detoxing Horses: a Top Ten List of Common Chemicals, Where They Come From, Where They Go, What They Do, and How to Get Them Out Safely This work represents more than 8 yrs of neuromuscular reflex point-based testing in horses and summarizes pesticides, vaccine-related, and other chemicals that commonly test as being present, and in which tissues. A variety of clinical conditions appear to be associated with these toxins, including muscle atrophy, metabolic issues such as hyperinsulinism/hypercortisolism, COPD, laminitis, rhabdomyolysis, poor vision, renal disease/back pain, tumors, neuritis/dermatitis, etc. Treatment to remove these chemicals has significantly improved or resolved many of these problems. We have developed a foundational 10 minute, 3 to 4 part detoxification protocol that has produced rapid improvement in many patients’ well-being and comfort as well as in their clinical condition. Pedro Luis Rivera, DVM, FACFN 2555 Wisconsin St. Sturtevant, WI 53177-1825 Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) An Introduction to Veterinary Chiropractic: The Basics Severe and Advanced Degenerative Joint Disease: Not To Be Seen As A Death Sentence Nor Life Long Crippling Disease Small animals It Is All About Balance: Part 1 It Is All About Balance: Part 2 Equine Hyoids: More than a Sac Functional Anatomy of the Equine Thoracic Limb What to do When Horses do not Hold the Adjustment – Keep it Simple Lecture Abstracts An Introduction to Veterinary Chiropractic: The Basics The goal for this lecture is to define and describe what “chiropractic” or “spinal manipulation” is as it applies to both humans and animals based on sound science. At the end of the lecture, the attendees will be able to list several ways in which VSMT or “Animal Chiropractic” works, how safe it is, when should it be utilized, who should provide this health care system and how it affects both the peripheral and central nervous system (i.e. the consequences of the adjustment). The presentation will utilize several methods to help attendees integrate the information that was presented. Severe and Advanced Degenerative Joint Disease: Not To Be Seen As A Death Sentence Nor Life Long Crippling Disease Small animals Sometimes, severe and advanced degenerative joint disease can be seen and or described by other veterinarians as a “life long sentence for suffering or early.” The goal for this lecture is to review several treatment protocols that can be used successfully to not only improve on treatment outcome but also to improve on quality of life for the patient that is being treated. Topics will cover ideas of exercises that owners can help the pets at home, treatment protocols that can be used at the veterinary hospital or clinics and lastly a discussion of several supplements that can be inexpensive and improve in the patient treatment outcome. It Is All About Balance (Part 1 and 2) This lecture will help the attendees understand where balance comes from, the systems that are involved and how they can be used to improve on the patient treatment outcome. Topics to be discussed include: basic anatomy and function of the cerebellum, basic anatomy of CN VIII, basic anatomy of the Vestibular Nuclei, basic Anatomy of the Vestibular Labyrinth, and basic Basic Stomatognathic System. This presentation will use not only present didactic information via PowerPoint, but integration of said information via case presentations. Equine Hyoids – More than a Sac This lecture will expand on the osseous and muscular anatomy of the hyoid system. We will define and predict how this afferent information is crucial for our equine patients to maintain good balance and how it can affect the trigeminal system. Functional Anatomy of the Equine Thoracic Limb This lecture will identify, and expand on the osseous and muscular anatomy of the equine thoracic limb. We will apply the presented information to help the attendees expand on the plausible differential diagnosis of bowed tendons. What to do When Horses do not Hold the Adjustment – Keep it Simple Abstract: It is not uncommon for clients to describe that after the first adjustment / treatment of their horse, there was improvement but it only lasted for several days. Our goal during this one hour lecture to is to list and classify several areas that are frequently overlooked (hence decreasing the treatment outcome) and providing several ideas on how to avoid these pitfalls. Jonathan Rudinger, RN, LMT 3347 McGregor Lane Toledo, Ohio 43623 www.PetMassage.com Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) Introduction to the Perspectives and Skills of Canine Massage Canine Massage Demonstration and Discussion of Myofascial Release More than a Closed Set of Manual Skills: Immersion in Feeling, Being and Responding Lecture Abstracts Introduction to the Perspectives and Skills of Canine Massage If you've received a great professional massage, then you know what it can do. One massage can be a life course corrector! Offer your clients their opportunity to know, too. Experience how canine massage skills shift your approach in how you touch your clients. Massage provides a perspective that is complementary to the practice of veterinary medicine. Learn the rationale for canine massage, its history, clinical applications, benefits for clients, pet-parents, the massage provider, and your clinic. Canine massage can complete your practice. Working from the perspective of massage/bodywork will shift your perspective and potential for caring for dogs. Canine Massage Demonstration and Discussion of Myofascial Release View and experience a canine massage demonstration. Learn how and why canine massage functions within its own paradigm. Learn about recent developments in the understanding and integration of myo-fascial release in the massage and bodywork field that have fundamentally changed the way we approach the dog's body-mind-spirit complex. How pervasive is fascia in the body? What is its role in the affecting the mind; the spirit? What is a release? What does a release look like? How does one feel? What is being released with myo-fascial release? This work is an essential skill for you to offer. More than a Closed Set of Manual Skills: Immersion in Feeling, Being and Responding Experience the value - and joy - of canine massage. Everyone massages their dogs. Professional canine massage is a comprehensive skill set that expands upon intuitive petting and rubbing. Soft yin skills of feeling, responding and observing, pervade every technique. Learn the value of maintaining presence, and the devastating effects of distraction/withdrawal. Learn why it is essential to track empathic responses to your client's releases. Your thoughts and those of your assistants and the pet parents, affect the health and wellness of your clients. Experiential exercises help you develop your awareness of holding patterns and fascial releases. Michelle Schraeder, DVM, MEd, FAAVA 3413 Mt. Baker Hwy Bellingham, WA 98226 Lecture Titles (50 minutes each) Canine/Feline Tui-Na Proof of Acupuncture Effectiveness: Are Double-Blind Studies the Only Choice for Validity? TCM Treatment of Cardiac Arrhythmias Lecture Abstracts- Canine/Feline Tui-Na: This presentation will discuss Tui-na, Chinese massage, and will show how and when one can integrate this treatment modality into one’s practice. Various Tui-na techniques will be demonstrated via video clips; Tui-na will be compared with other massage techniques; and lastly how Tui-na works in both a western medical and traditional Chinese medicine perspective will be covered. Cases where Tui-na was integrated into the treatment plan will be discussed, and it will be shown how a veterinarian can instruct a client in treatment techniques, especially with musculoskeletal pain and injury rehabilitation. Proof of Acupuncture Effectiveness: Are Double-Blind Studies the Only Choice for Validity?: Exploration of what truly constitutes validity in research and defining types of research beyond just double blind studies advocated by Evidence Based Medicine. Will define and explain types of validity, and discuss the original definition of Evidence Based Medicine. Will also cover the strengths and weaknesses of each type of research in order to demonstrate how each can offer something to the overall proof of validity for any treatment modality. Finally a more relevant and superior Levels of Evidence Research Pyramid will be proposed. Lecture will use humorous examples to illustrate some points. TCM Treatment of Cardiac Arrhythmias: Cardiac Arrhythmias are often not well described in various acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) references. Sometimes they are referred to instead as “palpitations”, rarely they are indexed as heart arrhythmias, and other times they are missing altogether. The term palpitations includes not only organic arrhythmias as a result of abnormalities in impulse generation or conduction, but also Shen disturbance conditions where the patient “feels” a functional altered heart rate due to fear, stress, or exertion. This discussion will primarily cover TCM diagnosis and treatment of “organic” arrhythmias, and will also consider the physiology behind cardiac arrhythmias to explain how acupuncture can alter cardiac rhythm and rate. Robert J. Silver, DMV, MS, CVA PO Box 590 Niwot, CO 80544-0590 Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) GM Foods and Pet Health Detoxification strategies for Living on a Dirty Planet Beta Glucans and the Canine Immune System An Introduction to “Natural” Nutrition: Food is the Best Medicine Lecture Abstracts GM Foods and Pet Health GM foods (Genetically Modified) have been touted as the savior of our Earth, that they will feed the many starving persons on our planet, and that they will increase the thriftiness of our livestock and feed industry. How wrong they are! Evidence has developed over the years since the introduction of GM foods, that in fact, they reduce fertility, increase deaths, destroy the nutrients in the soil, and lead to chronic degenerative diseases in the downstream consumers of GM foods. This lecture will present the evidence, and, if you are not already convinced, this hour will give you the facts, and proof that we all need to avoid GM foods at all costs when feeding ourselves, our families, and our family of animals. Detoxification strategies for Living on a Dirty Planet This hour will present practical information that you can impart to your clients, and incorporate into your own lives to reduce the negative health impact of the tens of thousands of tons of chemicals that are dumped onto our planet every day. No longer can you move to New Zealand to avoid pollution. This lecture will give you the verifiable evidence of this rampant massive pollution, and the solutions to help keep yourself and your patients and your family as healthy as possible. This is the 800 pound gorilla in the room when someone asks: “Why are there so many people and pets dying of cancer these days? Beta Glucans and the Canine Immune System Beta glucans are glucose polymers that provide structure to the cell walls of yeast, fungi, mushrooms and seaweed. They also interact with elements of the immune system of all members of the animal kingdom, from earthworms to elephants. This seminar will describe how glucans provide immune modulation in mammalian species and how these glucans can offer significant benefits to your patients who are immune-compromised, suffering from neoplastic conditions or infectious diseases. Several recently published studies will be presented in which glucans were given to immune-compromised shelter dogs and measured the improvement in their seroconversion to protective titers following vaccination for rabies, canine distemper and canine parvovirus over the group of shelter dogs not receiving the oral glucan supplementation. An Introduction to “Natural” Nutrition: Food is the Best Medicine Proponents of the “natural” diet believe it provides better nutrition which helps to optimize health and minimize disease. This 1 hour introductory level talk will provide information about different natural feeding strategies and the evidence that supports their value. Commercially-available diets, raw diets, home preparation and the supplements needed for balancing these diets will be covered. Grain-free, gluten-free, high protein, dehydrated and frozen raw natural diets offer a variety of choices for the pet owner and for the veterinarian to recommend. This class will help you to sort out these different feeding approaches and reach a better understanding of the best applications for these diets. Dr Lea Stogdale, DVM, Diplomate ACVIM 260 St. Anne's Road Winnipeg Manitoba R2M 3A4 Canada Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) Therapeutic Options: Low Dose, Short Course, Intermittent Owner Monitoring for Better Outcomes First Principles in Diagnosis and Therapy Lecture Abstracts Therapeutic Options: Low Dose, Short Course, Intermittent Do we always need to use the recommended dose? How long should a medication be given? Is intermittent therapy indicated? Can you break the pharmacology paradigm? Dr. Stogdale discusses the evidence, ideas and approaches to therapeutics. She will also discuss the concept of using therapy for diagnosis, its benefits and limitations. Owner Monitoring for Better Outcomes We can empower our pet owners to monitor various aspects of their pets to everyone’s benefit. Regular objective monitoring of healthy pets results in earlier vet visits and diagnoses of problems. In dogs and cats with chronic health conditions, home monitoring encourages owners to respond earlier to changes. Dr. Stogdale will discuss owner home monitoring in many conditions including diabetes, arthritis, kidney, heart and urinary disorders. First Principles in Diagnosis and Therapy Yawn: we know this stuff. We do, but we forget and fudge – to the detriment of our patients, our clients and ourselves. Dr. Stogdale takes a look at diagnostic tests and therapeutic approaches from the side, with humour, critically, through experience, and places them into use in your practice exam room. Mrs. drs. Tedje (A.G.M.) van Asseldonk ND IEZ/NVF: Rijksstraatweg 158, 6573 DG Beek Ubbergen (NL) Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) The science of zoopharmacognosy, where do we stand? Herbs in pastures and the health of grazing cows and goats (Parts 1 and 2) The doctrine of signatures in history and in modern herbalism Traditional concepts of European herbalism related to chemical ecology (Parts 1 and 2) Lecture Abstracts The science of zoopharmacognosy, where do we stand? Documented observations about animals using medicinal herbs are about 2000 years old, but this type of animal behaviour was neglected in official science until the recent 90’s. Currently it’s difficult to locate good research, although there are lots of anecdotal observations in this field. The interpretation of these observations is still under discussion as are scientifically valid methods that could help to shed more light on these interesting phenomena. Recommended reading: 1. Van Asseldonk &De Haas, 2006. Spontaneous foraging behaviour of primates in outdoor enclosures. http://www.ethnobotany.nl/Asseldonk-Haas.pdf 2. Van Asseldonk, 2006. The science of zoopharmacognosy: what do we know about animal self-medication? http://www.ethnobotany.nl/VAN%20ASSELDONK%20Lecture%200406%20Zoopharmacognosy.pdf Herbs in pastures and the health of grazing cows and goats lecture and workshop (Parts 1 and 2) Recently IEZ has conducted studies into the grazing behaviour of dairy herds, with a focus on medicinal herbs, both in free ranging in nature reserves and in organic farms. This research was performed in cooperation with other research institutes in the Netherlands. Methodology and results will be interactively discussed with participants and also some possible designs for follow-up studies. Recommended reading: 1. Van Asseldonk, 2006. The science of zoopharmacognosy: what do we know about animal self-medication? http://www.ethnobotany.nl/VAN%20ASSELDONK%20Lecture%200406%20Zoopharmacognosy.pdf 2. Provenza, 2008. What does it mean to be locally adapted and who cares anyway? http://www.animal-science.org/content/86/14_suppl/E271.full The doctrine of signatures in history and in modern herbalism The discussion whether form follows function or form creates function is closely related to the question of an existence of any (divine?) architecture in the (evolution of the) living world and therefore a non-go-area for many modern scientists. But could there be a mutual interaction (morphogenetic resonance) as suggested by the biologist Rupert Sheldrake? How does astrology fit in here? And does this teach us something about how animals in the wild gather food and drugs; is this the same way our ancestors did? Recommended reading: 1. BC Bennett Doctrine of Signatures: An Explanation of Medicinal Plant Discovery or Dissemination of Knowledge? Economic Botany vol 61, 2007(3) p. 246-255. See for a short version in Herbalgram: https://sites.google.com/site/kruidwis/signatuurleer-doctrine-of-signatures 2. Solanaceae chapter of German botanists W. Pelikan book on medicinal plants translated on: http://www.anthromed.org/Article.aspx?artpk=305 . Traditional concepts of European herbalism related to chemical ecology lecture and workshop (Parts 1 and 2) Traditional European herbalism has two major therapeutic principles: a constitutional (holistic) therapy and a patient specific approach. The basic concept is often referred to as the doctrine of four humours. The available medication (mostly food and herbs) was analogously allocated to four categories: hot or cold and, in addition, wet or dry. Currently these concepts are still in use in naturopathy practise. Based on a literature study IEZ presented the hypothesis that this classification of herbs may be related to the function of the secondary plant compounds for plant defence as described in chemo taxonomy and chemical ecology. Recommended reading: http://www.ethnobotany.nl/Traditional%20and%20modern%20herbalism%202001%20allpict.pdf http://www.ethnobotany.nl/Traditional%20herbal%20concept%20still%20in%20use%20Asseldonk.pdf Farm Animal Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) Homeopathic remedies and dosages in relation to the phytotherapy praxis Ethnoveterinary research: old remedies and their validation (Parts 1 & 2) Registration and marketing (perspectives) of herbal medicinal products in Europe Natural products renaissance following European ban on antibiotics in feed (Parts 1 & 2) Lecture Abstracts Homeopathic remedies and dosages in relation to the phytotherapy praxis In German herbalism the dosage seems to be of less importance than the herb choice. Here we see the influence of homeopathy, that estimates more the energetic/informative value of holistic herbal remedies as opposed to the material/chemical value. In English speaking countries higher dosages are used; this tradition was influenced by the US eclectic physicians. Modern research on hormesis, adaptogens and carvacrol suggests that a small dosage may lead to an unexpected response. Recommended reading: 1. Wiegant et al., 2009. Plant adaptogens increase lifespan and stress resistance in C. elegans. Biogerontology. Either by http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18536978 or by http://igitur-archive.library.uu.nl/bio/2008-0923-200705/wiegant_08_plantadaptogens.pdf 2. Van Assseldonk, 1996. Message in a bottle. http://www.ethnobotany.nl/message_bottle.htm Ethnoveterinary research: old remedies and their validation (Parts 1 & 2) lecture and workshop The first veterinary schools (ca 1800) concentrated on horses and owed much to farriery. Traditional use of herbs for animals can be found in farm handbooks from 1500-1900; afterwards chemical synthetic medicine gained popularity. Herb use in the Netherlands, Germany, Austria and Switzerland was very much influenced by the Mediterranean tradition. A lot of herbs were (and are) given to animals for similar conditions as in humans. Validation steps include international use, pharmacological research, clinical experience and RCT’s. Specific aspects amongst others are the influence of herbs on the rumen flora and vice versa. Recommended reading: 1. Van Asseldonk/Beijer 2006. Ethnoveterinary remedies in the NL http://www.ethnobotany.nl/Asseldonk_Beijer.pdf ( 2. Lans et al, 2007. Ethnoveterinary medicines used for ruminants in British Columbia, Canada http://www.ethnobiomed.com/content/3/1/11 3. Pieroni et al, 2006. Circum-Mediterranean cultural heritage and medicinal plant uses in traditional animal healthcare http://www.ethnobiomed.com/content/2/1/16 Registration and marketing (perspectives) of herbal medicinal products in Europe Very few farmers in Europe grow herbs to treat their animals like in the old days. Specific products have been developed, some by farmers, some industrial. Examples will be given of: - herbal medicinal products for animals (they have become rare in Europe as the registration is too expensive) - herbs as feed ingredients or supplemental feed (a booming market, both in pet food and in agriculture) - herbal feed additives (mainly registered for taste improvement but the range of action is larger; eg Indian herbs) - other herbal preparations (Bach remedies; essential oils, homeopathic tinctures) Recommended reading: 1. Bremmers, 2012. EFSA renews 7 guidances. http://www.allaboutfeed.net/Process-Management/Management/2012/3/EFSA-renews-seven-guidances-AAF013008W 2. EU project (example) http://ec.europa.eu/research/agriculture/success_replace_en.htm Natural products renaissance following European ban on antibiotics in feed (Parts 1 & 2) lecture and workshop As the European ban on antibiotics in feed approached (2006) many products (feed additives of food ingredients) came to the market. Several were tested by independent research institutes. Interesting applications and innovation were developed. The position of natural products in farm management was discussed. In the Netherlands results of a literature survey were published in the Natural Health series. Recommended reading: 1. Kleijer et al, 2008. Herbal products for pig health http://www.ethnobotany.nl/ABSTRACT%20WOCMAP%20CAPE%20TOWN-wijzigingen%20al.pdf 2. Groot et al, 2011. 3 practical books on the use of natural products for farmers: Natural dairy health . http://www.fyto-v.nl/docs/sb_dairy.pdf Natural pigs health. http://www.fyto-v.nl/docs/sb_pigs.pdf Natural poultry health. http://www.fyto-v.nl/docs/sb_poultry.pdf Matthew Wood, MSc (Herbal Medicine), Registered Herbalist (AHG) N7874 535th St. Spring Valley, WI, 54767 Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) The Practice of Traditional Western Herbalism (Parts 1 - 6) Lecture Abstracts The Practice of Traditional Western Herbalism (Parts 1 – 6) Since the time of Galen Western herbalism has been practiced on a threefold foundation: (1) energetics of the herb (hot, cold, damp, dry, tense, relaxed), (2) organ-affinity, matching the remedy to the area of distress, and (3) herbal actions (thinning, thickening, raising, lowering, etc.) This gives us a picture of the underlying context behind the specific local lesion that is so often the focus of biomedicine. To the above three I would also add: (4) specific indications and medicines. We will talk a lot about specifics: when a remedy matches a specific condition, energetic configuration, set of symptoms, one symptom. Without knowing a lot about herbalism specific indications can produce wonders in results---it is a sort of 'training wheels' for the beginner, and is how I began. Huisheng Xie, DVM, PhD, MS 9700 Hwy 318 West Reddick, FL 32686 Lecture Titles (50 Min. Each) TCVM for Cancer TCVM for Cushing’s Disease in Dogs TCVM for Equine Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance in Horses TCVM For Diagnosis and Treatment of Foot Lameness in Horses Top Five Chinese Herbal Formulas for Horses Equine Food Therapy Lecture Abstracts TCVM for Cancer The top cancers in companion animals include lymphoma, mammary tumors/cancer, mast cell tumor (MCT), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma and feline carcinoma and fibrosarcoma. This presentation focuses on the TCVM etiology and pathology of cancer, and fundamental principles to select herbs, acupuncture and food therapy for these top cancers in small animal practice. Clinical case studies will also be presented to demonstrate how to select acupuncture and herbs to treat these cancers in dogs and cats. TCVM for Cushing’s Disease in Dogs Pituitary hyperadrenocorticism (PDH), or Cushings disease in dogs can be divided into three Patterns: Yin Deficiency, Qi +Yin Deficiency, and Yang Deficiency. The retrospective study was conducted and success of treatment was monitored with one or more tests such as the ACTH stimulation test, urine cortisol to creatinine ratio, low dose dexamethasone suppression test, and endogenous serum cortisol concentration assays. Success rates for the dogs treated with TCVM including herbs and acupuncture were 95% exhibiting clinical improvement and nearly 50% of the dogs with monitoring parameter values returning to the normal range. TCVM for Equine Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance in Horses Equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) is the most commonly seen diseases of the endocrine disorders in horses. It primarily occurs in older ponies and horses, but also affects horses as young as ten year old. There are five TCVM Patterns: Liver Qi Stagnation, Spleen Qi Deficiency with Damp-Heat, Yin Deficiency, Qi+Yin Deficiency and Yang Deficiency. Clinical case studies will be presented to demonstrate how to make a TCVM pattern and select a herbal formula and acupuncture protocol. TCVM For Diagnosis and Treatment of Foot Lameness in Horses Every horseman knows the adage, “no foot no horse,” and indeed much equine lameness involves the distal limb. Sensitivity at specific groups of acupoints along the Meridians is highly correlated with discomfort originating at various local sites including foot.1-5 Clinicians that are skilled at assessment of Jing Luo diagnostic points find it to be a straightforward, non-invasive, low cost, and invaluable clinical skill. Subtle and even subclinical musculoskeletal problems can be identified and treated, enhancing performance and well-being of the horse, and potentially helping to prevent progression to more serious conditions. Top Five Chinese Herbal Formulas for Horses Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM) has been administered to horses in China for more than 4,000 years.1 Many clinical studies have indicated that CHM is effective for treating a wide variety of medical conditions in horses. 2-10 This presentation focuses on the clinical application of top 5 Chinese veterinary herbal formulas in horses. These 5 formulas are Sheng Tong Zhu Yu Tang for pain management, Tian Wang B Xin Dan for anxiety, Bu Gan Qiang Jin for tendon/ligament disorders, Chai Hu Shu Gan for aggression, Yunnan Bai Yao for bleeding. Equine Food Therapy Food therapy is the art and science of using selected food ingredients or/and superior herbs to feed each individual based upon their inborn tendencies, their age, their species, their geographical location, their personality and their current disharmony or disease process. Each recipe has been developed under the supervision of Five Elements, Eight Principles and Zang-fu physiology and pathology. Food therapy can be used to cure skin conditions, promote general health and prevent diseases, and also to be an adjunct therapy for other medical conditions including chronic diarrhea, colic, heaves, coughing, infertility, equine metabolic syndrome and obesity.