Sunday, 6 August 2017

Preservatives in Personal Hygiene and Cosmetic Products, Topical Medications, and Household Cleaners in Spain.

Actas Dermosifiliogr. 2017 Jun 30. pii: S0001-7310(17)30205-3. doi: 10.1016/j.ad.2017.04.003. [Epub ahead of print] [Article in English, Spanish] Pastor-Nieto MA1, Alcántara-Nicolás F2, Melgar-Molero V2, Pérez-Mesonero R2, Vergara-Sánchez A2, Martín-Fuentes A2, González-Muñoz P2, de Eusebio-Murillo E2. Author information 1 Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital Universitario de Guadalajara , Guadalajara, España; Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, España. Electronic address: mapastornieto@gmail.com. 2 Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital Universitario de Guadalajara , Guadalajara, España; Universidad de Alcalá de Henares, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, España. Abstract INTRODUCTION: Preservatives are added to cosmetic, household cleaning, and other industrial products to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Unfortunately, exposure to these substances can cause sensitization. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between January and June 2015, we analyzed the ingredients of 2300 products commercially available in Spain to identify the frequency of a wide variety of preservatives in different product categories. We analyzed 1093 skin care and cosmetic products sold exclusively in pharmacies (dermocosmetics), 458 household cleaning and personal hygiene and cosmetic products sold in supermarkets, 636 topical medications, and 113 cosmetic products sold in a herbal shop. RESULTS: Phenoxyethanol, citric acid, sodium benzoate, and potassium sorbate were very common in all the cosmetic product categories. Parabens were present in 16.1% of dermocosmetic products, 14.45% of cosmetic products available in supermarkets, 0.88% of cosmetic products available in the herbal shop, 5.18% of topical medications, and in none of the cleaning products. Isothiazolinones were identified in 2.56% of dermocosmetic products, 18% of cosmetic products in supermarkets, 7.9% of cosmetic products in the herbal shop, 63.63% of household cleaners, and in none of the topical medications. Formaldehyde releasers were detected in 5.76% of dermocosmetic products, 6.42% of cosmetic products sold in supermarkets, 7.96% of cosmetic products sold in the herbal shop, 3.93% of topical medications, and 16.74% of household cleaners. CONCLUSIONS: Evaluation of the presence of preservatives in everyday products allows us to indirectly estimate exposure levels to each one. Measures restricting the use of the most problematic preservatives need to be strengthened. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved. KEYWORDS: Conservantes; Contact dermatitis; Cosmetics; Cosméticos; Dermatitis de contacto; Formaldehyde releasers; Formaldehído; Methylisothiazolinone; Metilisotiazolinona; Parabenos; Parabens; Preservatives PMID: 28673419 DOI: 10.1016/j.ad.2017.04.003

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