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Friday, 25 May 2018

A Review of Coralilla (Antigonon leptopus): An Invasive and Popular Urban Bush Medicine in Jamaica

May 2018Economic Botany DOI: 10.1007/s12231-018-9415-5 Ina VandebroekIna VandebroekDavid PickingStacey Aiken Brian Boom https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12231-018-9415-5 Abstract Antigonon leptopus is a smothering, habitat-transforming vine with showy pink flowers. Originating in Mexico, it is now widespread or invasive on tropical islands around the world, including the West Indies, as a consequence of active human dispersal and disturbance. Using mixed methods research, we assessed the species’ (1) historical geographic spread throughout the Americas, (2) local ethnobotanical importance in Jamaica, and (3) biomedical potential as an herbal medicine. Methods included georeferencing of time-stamped herbarium collections from pre-1900 to 2016, literature review, and ethnobotanical research in rural and urban Jamaica (n = 58 participants). Results demonstrated that A. leptopus has spread aggressively in the West Indies since the 1950s. It has become a problematic invasive species in urban Jamaica, which has likely facilitated its local popularity as an herbal medicine. In urban Jamaica, ethnobotanical interviews ranked the species as the fourth most frequently reported medicinal plant. In contrast, A. leptopus was present but did not dominate the vegetation in rural Jamaica, and was never mentioned during interviews. The biomedical literature offers limited support for its biological activity, while showing no acute toxic effects. The ethnobotany of A. leptopus showcases the dynamic interplay between people, plants, and the environment.

Ethnomedicobotanical study of indigenous knowledge on medicinal plants used for the treatment of reproductive problems in Nalbari district, Assam, India

J Ethnopharmacol. 2018 Jan 10;210:386-407. doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2017.07.024. Epub 2017 Jul 19. Adhikari PP1, Talukdar S2, Borah A3. Author information 1 Genoine Research Laboratory Pvt. Ltd., Subhash Nagar, Karimganj, Assam 788710, India. Electronic address: dr.parthaadhikari@gmail.com. 2 Department of Environmental Science, Arunachal University of Studies, Namsai 792103, Arunachal Pradesh, India. 3 Department of Botany, Birjhora Mahavidyalaya, Bongaigaon 783380, Assam, India. Abstract ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Reproductive problems are becoming the most predominant health care problems in many countries. World Health Organization (WHO), in 2012, also exemplified maternal illnesses, for instance, birth asphyxia and post birth difficulties are rising at an alarming rate. In addition, not all abnormalities of the human reproductive system have the same origin; the effects of reproductive problems would likely been affected by both male and female. For easy accessibility and affordability, medicinal plants are playing crucial role in primary healthcare services in India and their use is moreover, an integral part of the cultural heritage. However, our growing understanding of the human reproductive problems are segregated and scanty for herbal medications. AIM OF THE STUDY: To document the local name of the medicinal plants used by both male and female from indigenous knowledge for the treatment of reproductive ailments and to explore their biological and pharmacological confirmation and to address the class of secondary metabolites present therein. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The results stem in September 2015-April 2016 from an array of informations that were collected by direct interviews of the traditional medicinal practitioners in three villages, viz. Jaha, Niz-Bahjani and Madhupur of the southern Nalbari district, Assam. Both semi-structured and open-ended interview schedule was carried out with purposively selected individuals and focus group discussion (FGD) in the three selected sites for this study. Systematic analysis of fidelity level percentage (FL %), preference ranking percentage (PR %) and formulation scoring (FS) were calculated. Electronic databases such as Google, Google Scholar, and ScienceDirect were also been used to search existing pharmacological citations. Finally, qualitative chemical profiling were executed for the plants whose PR % scores ≥ 65. RESULTS: A total of 71 plant species belonging to 48 families and 64 genera are reported to be used for the treatment of several reproductive problems such as, infertility in male, impotence, erectile dysfunctioning, retrograde ejaculation and sexual potency in men and in women, aphrodisiac, metrorrhagia, infertility, dysmenorrhea and/or post birth difficulties under mono (57), di (17) and poly (8) herbal formulations. Herbs (40.85%) were reported as the most common lifeform, whereas leaves (22.54%) and the roots (22.54%) were the commonly used plant parts against different ailments. Extracts of Abroma augusta L. (stem) (FL: 66.67%, PR: IM-77.33%, L-65.33, FS: 2), Morinda angustifolia Roxb. (bark) (FL: 64.29%, PR: L-68%, FS: 1), Hodgsonia heteroclita Roxb. (fruit) (FL: 63.64%, PR: IF-65.33, FS: 0.25) and Hibiscus mutabilis L. (stem) (FL: 40%, PR: IM-68%, IIM: 65.33%, IML-68%, FS: 2) were than selected for further phytochemical analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Of the 71 plants used for reproductive management system, the highest number of plants were used for the treatment of irregular menstruation (22) followed by infertility (in both men and women) (19), vaginal disorder and leucorrhoea (9) and sexual potency (8). The qualitative chemical profiling have demonstrated the presence of alkaloids, carbohydrates, phenolic compounds, flavonoids and phytosterols, in maximum concentrations. Additionally, these data may be the most important resource for the new discovery of many bioactive principles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. KEYWORDS: Bioactive principles; Focus group discussion; Open-ended interview; Photochemical analysis; Reproductive problems; Semi-structured interview

Evaluación de la actividad antioxidante y antimicrobiana de extractos de hojas de Tamarindus indica L. como premisa para su introducción en la medicina complementaria. Tesis en opción al título de Doctor en Ciencias de la Salud.Tesista:Julio Cesar Escalona A.,Tutores:Dr.C.V.Gustavo Sierra and Dr.C.Humberto Morris

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/323744595_Evaluacion_de_la_actividad_antioxidante_y_antimicrobiana_de_extractos_de_hojas_de_Tamarindus_indica_L_como_premisa_para_su_introduccion_en_la_medicina_complementaria_Tesis_en_opcion_al_titulo_de_Docto/references Evaluación de la actividad antioxidante y antimicrobiana de extractos de hojas de Tamarindus indica L. como premisa para su introducción en la medicina complementaria. Tesis en opción al título de Doctor en Ciencias de la Salud.Tesista:Julio Cesar Escalona A.,Tutores:Dr.C.V.Gustavo Sierra and Dr.C.Humberto Morris March 2011 Thesis for: Dr.Ciencias de la Salud/PhD.Advisor: Prof.Dr.Gustavo Sierra G.(Director de Tesis), Prof.Dr.Humberto J. Morris (Co-Tutor) Project: Investigacion,desarrollo y producción de sustancias deinteres biomedico a partir de extractos depalntas Julio Cesar Escalona ArranzJulio Cesar Escalona ArranzGustavo SierraGustavo SierraHumberto J. MorrisHumberto J. Morris

Thursday, 24 May 2018

transport person? uses library computer to help stuck Canadians and Americans

http://virl.bc.ca/branches/south-cowichan Drivers still stuck hours after fuel truck crash closes Malahat Highway -http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/overturned-tanker-truck-spills-fuel-closes-malahat-highway-1.4676715

Effect of Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel) on menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women: a randomized, triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Menopause. 2017 Sep;24(9):1017-1021. doi: 10.1097/GME.0000000000000881. Rahimikian F1, Rahimi R, Golzareh P, Bekhradi R, Mehran A. Author information 1 1Nursing and Midwifery Care Research Center 2Department of Midwifery, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran 3Department of Traditional Pharmacy, School of Traditional Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran 4Phyto Pharmacology Interest Group (PPIG), Universal Scientific Education and Research Network (USERN), Tehran, Iran 5School of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran 6Barij Medicinal Herbs Research Center, Kashan, Iran 7Statistical Department, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Abstract OBJECTIVE: Preliminary data suggest that Foeniculum vulgare (fennel) can be an effective treatment for menopausal symptoms. This trial was designed to assess the efficacy of fennel in the management of menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women. METHODS: In this triple-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 90 postmenopausal women aged 45 to 60 years in Tehran were randomly assigned to treatment (n = 45) or placebo (n = 45) groups. The participants received 8 weeks of treatment with soft capsules containing 100 mg fennel or a placebo (2 per day for each group). The participants were followed for 2 weeks postintervention to assess the continuance of the effect of intervention. The Menopause Rating Scale (MRS) questionnaire was used to assess changes in menopausal symptoms at baseline and at 4, 8, and 10 weeks after onset of intervention. RESULTS: The groups recorded similar mean scores on the MRS questionnaire before intervention. After intervention, the treatment group showed a significant decrease in the mean MRS score. The results of the Friedman test showed significant differences between the mean score at baseline and those at 4, 8, and 10 weeks after onset of intervention in the treatment group (P < 0.001), whereas there were no significant differences in the placebo group. When the fennel and the placebo groups were compared, the independent t test showed significant differences in mean scores between groups at 4, 8, and 10 weeks (2 weeks postintervention; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Fennel is an effective and safe treatment to reduce menopausal symptoms in postmenopausal women without serious side effects. More clinical trials with larger populations are required to confirm this result. PMID: 28509813 DOI: 10.1097/GME.0000000000000881 [Indexed for MEDLINE]

Phenol-enriched olive oils improve HDL antioxidant content in hypercholesterolemic subjects. A randomized, double-blind, cross-over, controlled trial.

Format: Abstract Send to J Nutr Biochem. 2018 Jan;51:99-104. doi: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2017.09.010. Epub 2017 Sep 28. Phenol-enriched olive oils improve HDL antioxidant content in hypercholesterolemic subjects. A randomized, double-blind, cross-over, controlled trial. Farràs M1, Fernández-Castillejo S2, Rubió L3, Arranz S4, Catalán Ú2, Subirana I5, Romero MP6, Castañer O7, Pedret A8, Blanchart G9, Muñoz-Aguayo D7, Schröder H10, Covas MI11, de la Torre R12, Motilva MJ6, Solà R2, Fitó M13. Author information 1 Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group, Regicor Study Group. IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain; CIBER de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y la Nutrición (CIBEROBN); Ph.D. Program in Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biomedicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Barcelona, Spain. 2 Research Unit on Lipids and Atherosclerosis, St. Joan de Reus University Hospital, Institut d'Investigació Sanitària Pere Virgili (IISPV), Functional Nutrition, Oxidation, and Cardiovascular Disease (NFOC-SALUT) group, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Sant Llorenç 21, 43201 Reus, Spain. 3 Research Unit on Lipids and Atherosclerosis, St. Joan de Reus University Hospital, Institut d'Investigació Sanitària Pere Virgili (IISPV), Functional Nutrition, Oxidation, and Cardiovascular Disease (NFOC-SALUT) group, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Sant Llorenç 21, 43201 Reus, Spain; Food Technology Department, UTPV-XaRTA, Agrotecnio Center, University of Lleida, Alcalde Rovira Roure 191, 25198 Lleida, Spain. 4 Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group, Regicor Study Group. IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain. 5 CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP); Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Genetics Research Group, Regicor Study Group. IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain. 6 Food Technology Department, UTPV-XaRTA, Agrotecnio Center, University of Lleida, Alcalde Rovira Roure 191, 25198 Lleida, Spain. 7 Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group, Regicor Study Group. IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain; CIBER de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y la Nutrición (CIBEROBN). 8 Research Unit on Lipids and Atherosclerosis, St. Joan de Reus University Hospital, Institut d'Investigació Sanitària Pere Virgili (IISPV), Functional Nutrition, Oxidation, and Cardiovascular Disease (NFOC-SALUT) group, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Sant Llorenç 21, 43201 Reus, Spain; Eurecat-Centre Tecnològic de Nutrició i Salut (Eurecat-CTNS), Reus, Spain. 9 Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Genetics Research Group, Regicor Study Group. IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain. 10 Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group, Regicor Study Group. IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain; CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP). 11 Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group, Regicor Study Group. IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain; CIBER de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y la Nutrición (CIBEROBN); NUPROAS Handelsbolag, Nacka, Sweden. 12 CIBER de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y la Nutrición (CIBEROBN); Integrative Pharmacology and Systems Neuroscience Research Group, IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain; Universitat Pompeu Fabra (CEXS-UPF), Doctor Aiguader 80, 08003 Barcelona, Spain. 13 Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group, Regicor Study Group. IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Spain; CIBER de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y la Nutrición (CIBEROBN). Electronic address: mfito@imim.es. Abstract At present, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function is thought to be more relevant than HDL cholesterol quantity. Consumption of olive oil phenolic compounds (PCs) has beneficial effects on HDL-related markers. Enriched food with complementary antioxidants could be a suitable option to obtain additional protective effects. Our aim was to ascertain whether virgin olive oils (VOOs) enriched with (a) their own PC (FVOO) and (b) their own PC plus complementary ones from thyme (FVOOT) could improve HDL status and function. Thirty-three hypercholesterolemic individuals ingested (25 ml/day, 3 weeks) (a) VOO (80 ppm), (b) FVOO (500 ppm) and (c) FVOOT (500 ppm) in a randomized, double-blind, controlled, crossover trial. A rise in HDL antioxidant compounds was observed after both functional olive oil interventions. Nevertheless, α-tocopherol, the main HDL antioxidant, was only augmented after FVOOT versus its baseline. In conclusion, long-term consumption of phenol-enriched olive oils induced a better HDL antioxidant content, the complementary phenol-enriched olive oil being the one which increased the main HDL antioxidant, α-tocopherol. Complementary phenol-enriched olive oil could be a useful dietary tool for improving HDL richness in antioxidants. KEYWORDS: Cholesterol efflux; Functional virgin olive oil; HDL antioxidants; HDL fluidity; HDL functionality; Phenol PMID: 29125992 DOI: 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2017.09.010

Seafood Intake, Sexual Activity, and Time to Pregnancy

ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT https://academic.oup.com/jcem/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1210/jc.2018-00385/5001729?redirectedFrom=fulltext Audrey J Gaskins, Sc.D Rajeshwari Sundaram, Ph.D Germaine M Buck Louis, Ph.D Jorge E Chavarro, M.D., Sc.D The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, jc.2018-00385, https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2018-00385 Published: 23 May 2018 Article history Cite Permissions Share Abstract Context Marine long-chain omega-3 fatty acids have been positively related to markers of fecundity in both men and women. However, seafood, their primary food source, can also be a source of toxicants, which may counteract the reproductive benefits. Objective To examine the relationship of male and female seafood intake with time to pregnancy (TTP). Design Our prospective cohort study included 501 couples planning pregnancy who participated in the Longitudinal Investigation of Fertility and the Environment Study (2005-2009) and were followed for up to1 year or until pregnancy was detected. Seafood intake was collected daily during follow-up in journals. Setting Couples residing in Michigan and Texas were recruited using population-based sampling frameworks. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was time to pregnancy as determined by an in-home pregnancy test. A secondary outcome was sexual intercourse frequency (SIF) as recorded in daily journals. Results Couples where the male and female partners consumed ≥8 seafood servings/cycle had 47% (95% CI 7, 103%) and 60% (95% CI 15, 122%) higher fecundity (shorter TTP) compared to couples with male and female partners who consumed ≤1 seafood serving/cycle, respectively. Couples in which both partners consumed ≥8 seafood servings/cycle had 61% (95% CI 17, 122%) higher fecundity compared to couples consuming less. Male and female partners with the highest seafood intake (≥8 servings/cycle) also had 22% higher SIF. Conclusions Higher male and female seafood intake was associated with higher frequency of sexual intercourse and fecundity among a large prospective cohort of couples attempting pregnancy. Issue Section: Clinical Research Article